The Problem

Pets are constantly at risk for infections and illnesses. Without a way to for pets to communicate their pain or discomfort, owners typically become aware of these symptoms when they worsen and become visibly noticeable. The owner’s delayed reaction usually results in higher vet bills and sometimes even permanent damage to the pet’s health.

As it stands today, Vets bear the burden of testing and monitoring our pets, and owners
are left with little to no way to take proactive measures that protect their pet's health.

THE OPPORTUNITY

Let’s take testing technology and put it directly into

pet owner's hands, creating a better experience for all.

Design

Principles

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1.

EMPOWERMENT

The solution had to empower the pet owner to make better decisions for their pet not to disable them with anxiety or worry.

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2.

The technology going into the solution could not be so elaborative that it became unattainable to a pet owner. It would need to become cheaper than a vet visit.

AFFORDABILITY

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3.

The solution needed to be so intuitive that it was invisible in the routine of the pet and the pet owner. This should not become another chore for the user
but rather a seamless integration embedded into
their lifestyle.

INVISIBILTY

Consumer

Journey

First, I wanted to understand how could we could embed this product into the daily routine of the pet and the pet owner.

I took a look at the daily routine of a pet owner, separating when activities when they were together and when they were not.

CONSUMER JOURNEY

After looking at their journey, I began to see a huge opportunity with everyday objects that the pet and the pet owner are constantly interacting with.

CONSUMER JOURNEY

To understand how at these objects could help test and monitor a pets health, I wanted to first see how the tests were being done today.

RESEARCH

I decided to cross reference what these objects came in to contact and what the vet tests came into contact with to see if both were gathering the same content.

CROSS-REFERENCING

Seeing that four everyday objects were being used to collect the same content that vet tests were collecting, I started to ideate on how these objects could become smart objects and monitor the daily health of the pet.

IDEATION

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1.

POTTY BAGS

Potty bags that change color to signify detected worms in the fecal matter.

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2.

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3.

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4.

WATER BOWLS

Water bowls that alert the owner of infections and/or dental decay that they detect in the saliva that the dog is transmitting into the bowl.

TOYS

Toys that alert the owner of infections and/or dental decay in the saliva and dental impressions that the dog is transmitting into the toy.

COLLAR

Collars that provides the owner with constant feedback on the dog’s heart rate, temperature and activity level.

After doing some further research to see

if there were any similarities in the

market, I found a few smart collars and

not much more.

Today, there is nothing that exists as an

health hub for pets. Pet owners need a

place where they can monitor all aspects

of a pet’s health while also allowing the

collected data to assist the vet in medical

decisions for their pets.

I decided to create a suite of smart

products that would feed into one health

hub for the pet, while gathering feedback

from the vet as well.

FURTHER STEPS

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The Pet Health Hub

The Pet Health Hub is an all-in-one medical monitoring device for your pet. The Pet Health Smart Products feed into the hub, allowing the owner to stay on top of their pet’s health and report back to the vet with the data collected.